Posted by & filed under Resources.

Taking Care of Your Lawn

How to make the neighbors jealous of your beautiful grass!

 

Watering Grass

 

  • Grass needs approximately 1 1/2″ of water weekly year round. During hot summer months it most likely will require more water depending on things like temperature and sun exposure.
  • Watering should be done as early in the morning as possible to allow the grass to use it through the day, avoid nigh time watering to prevent mold and other issues.
  • Water 2-3 times a week deeply instead of short spurts every day. Don’t water so much that it’s running out of your lawn down the street.
  • Check sprinklers regularly to make sure they are hitting all areas of the lawn.

Fertilizing Grass

 

  • Grass should be fertilized no less than twice a year, but for best results 4 times a year is ideal.
  • When do I fertilize?
    • If fertilizing only twice a year the important times are the first and last fertilizing. 1st to promote new growth and last to help it survive the winter.
      • Fertilize between Easter and Memorial day during the spring, and then again around Halloween (most important).
    • For BEST results fertilize 4 times a year to promote early growth, continues rooting and growth helping to reduce water needs and to ensure little to no winter die-back.
      1. Easter – Memorial day just depending on the weather, Breaking dormancy.
      2. 4th of July, promoting new growth!
      3. Labor Day, continuing to promote growth and food.
      4. Halloween, Winter fertilizing to supply food through cold months(Most Important).
  • Grass fertilizing can also be supplemented with products like Soil-Activator which through humates help provide food for beneficial micro organism, helping to increase the grasses natural ability to use and create nutrients.

Few Extra Grass Tips

 

  • Always make sure to sharpen your lawnmower blade no less than once a year for safety and quality have it professionally done. Tony’s Saw Shop Charges about $8.50 a blade, well worth it!
    • Dull blades are often the reason for the tips of grass to start browning because the mower is actually tearing the grass and not cutting it.
  • Not all grasses do well in the shade or other areas so know what kind of grass you have for the right area, blends are best for our climate.

Dogs and Grass

 

  • Dogs specifically female dogs cause yellow spots to form in areas where they pee, which will eventually kill that are. Solutions?
    • If you have a dog apply Horticultural Limestone to your lawn especially in their favorite spots, this helps to balance the PH and prevent those spots from forming.
    • If you are near them when they go hose or pore extra water directly on that spot if they have a favorite spot apply a little extra water there regularly to help run it off, be careful not to over do it.
  • Organic/mineral based fertilizers without weed killer like Pro-Rich Turf Food is completely safe to use around your pets.
  • Use a well blended turf grass kind of mix that can withstand high traffic.

Posted by & filed under Resources.

Garlic the Fall Frontier

 

A Brief History of Garlic

Garlic has been a part of human history for over 7,000 years believed to originate in central Asia, and being widely used as many as 5,000 years ago, most highly known for it’s use in the Mediterranean. Soldiers, sailors and Gladiators would eat garlic to give them strength before battle. Along with a diet of bread beer Ancient Egyptians used garlic in both culinary and medicinal ways. Although still more commonly used in Mediterranean cuisine other parts in Europe like England started growing and using garlic more frequently in the 1500’s. Garlic has even been used as recently as World War I and II as an antiseptic, garlic was used to help treat and prevent infections like gangrene (due to the lack of antibiotics). Supplies of penicillin were so scarce English and Russians used crush garlic as a topical treatment on wounds to prevent infections, which led to its nickname “Russian Penicillin.”

 

Fall 2016 Garlic

 

Hardneck Varieties

Purple Stripe & Marbled P. Stripe

Chesnok Red – Excellent baking garlic. Sweet, full of flavor. Beautiful purple color. Stores until mid-winter. Approx. 11 cloves

Metechi – Hot flavor with nice aftertaste. Does well in colder climates. Adaptable and stores until spring. Approx 6 cloves

Purple Glazer – Easy to peel with large purple heads. Best used in fresh pesto. Very short storage. Sweetens with baking Approx. 9-10 cloves

Russian Red – Hot enough to raise the brow. Extremely popular and “good table” garlic. Paradox of complexity and simplicity. Approx. 6-8 cloves

Rocambole

Bavarian – Rich, smoky flavor that’s strong not hot. Excellent Roasted. Reliable in high elevations. approx. 6-8 cloves

German Red – Full bodied, strong and spicy. Widely popular, reliable and easy to peel. The garlic that set the standard. Approx. 8-10 cloves

Spanish Roja – Restaurant favorite! Due to ease of peel and great flavor. Good for high elevations. Approx. 11 cloves

Porcelain

Music – Hot when raw, sweet when baked. One of the hardiest, disease resistant varieties. Adaptable in most climates. Approx. 6 cloves

Softneck Varieties

 

Artichoke

California Early – With a mild flavor, excellent storage qualities this work-horse is dependable. Great fresh and is often braided. approx 10-16 cloves

Chet’s Italian – Sumptuous, strong flavor that is good for pesto, fresh and raw. Easy to grow & braids well. Long Storage. Approx. 10-12 cloves

Inchelium –Mild at harvest but stronger with storage. Large 3″ heads with a spicy flavor is a great all-purpose choice. Approx. 10 cloves

Pueblo Early – Medium flavor with large heads. Great all-purpose variety that is versatile in any garden Approx. 12-15 cloves

Susanville – Improved variety that is a great roaster and can be used for pickling. stores well and is an excellent choice to braid. Approx. 8-10 cloves

Silverskin

Silverwhite – Large bulb variety that is productive in all climates. Mild flavor grows pungent with storage. Approx. 12-15 cloves

 Garlic varieties info and facts

 

Growing info and tips.

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Watering Tips

 

Keeping your plants properly watered is one of the most important aspects of caring for your garden. Check your plants daily for water. This doesn’t mean they need water every day, but making sure is important. During the hottest parts of the summer, you may want to check your garden twice a day for anything in wilt, once in the morning and once in the evening, particularly for new plantings.

Wilting doesn’t always mean watering is needed, wilting can be over watering too.

A simple way to check your plants’ moisture level is to use a soil moisture meter. A moisture meter takes out some of the guess-work, by providing an easy reading of 1 to 10. For most plants if it’s between 2 and 4, plants are ready for a drink. At that time, water deeply and thoroughly and then wait for it to dry again.

Hand watering deeply can be thoroughly achieved by giving the plant a good drink (In a container fill to the rim) allowing it to soak in and then repeat the watering process 1 to 2 more times.

Sprinkler watering is best done at a low and slow pace to allow proper saturation. let an area soak for 20-30 min on a low to medium setting, not pounding the plants.

Moisture Meter

Fertilizer and Watering

 

When using a liquid/water soluble fertilizer be sure to moisten the soil first, otherwise most of that fertilizer will run right through past the roots and go to waste. Dampen the root are first and then go back and water again with your fertilizer solution.

Watering Grass

 

  • Grass needs approximately 1 1/2″ of water weekly year round. During hot summer months it most likely will require more water depending on things like temperature and sun exposure.
  • Watering should be done as early in the morning as possible to allow the grass to use it through the day, avoid nigh time watering to prevent mold and other issues.
  • Water 2-3 times a week deeply instead of short spurts every day. Don’t water so much that it’s running out of your lawn down the street.
  • Check sprinklers regularly to make sure they are hitting all areas of the lawn.

 

 

 

Posted by & filed under Recipes.

We hope you enjoy these delicious recipes!!!

Caribbean Curry Goat

Courtesy of Marilan Luttrell and Easter Egg Acres http://www.eastereggacres.com/

  • 2# Goat meat, chunks or ground
  • 1 lime juiced and all the zest
  • 1 Tbs. salt
  • 1tsp pepper
  • 2 ancho or scotch bonnet peppers seeded
  • 1/2 tsp. each thyme & ground allspice
  • 3 Tbsp. curry powder
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • Mix all these together and let the meat marinade 2 hours or up to overnight.
  • ¼ cup oil
  • 2 tomatoes diced
  • 1 15 oz. can tomato sauce
  • 7 cups chicken broth (goat broth if you have it) I used chicken for the fair

1 cup uncooked quick pearl barley Brown the meat mix in the oil. If using ground you can omit the oil but I used it then skimmed the dish after it was chilled. If using chunks reserve the marinade to add back later. (Add marinade)Add the tomatoes and sauce and simmer 3 minutes. Add the barley during the last hour to help thicken the stew. Mmmmmmm…mmmmmmmmmmmm! ENJOY!

PayDay Cookies

  • 1 1/2 C. graham cracker crumbs1/2 C. flour
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 14 oz. sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/2 C. butter, softened
  • 4 oz. flaked coconut
  • 12 oz. semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1 C. chopped pecans

In small bowl mix together the graham cracker crumbs, flour and baking powder. In a large mixer beat milk and butter until smooth. Mix in graham cracker mixture until well blended. Stir in coconut, chocolate chips and pecans. Place mixture in refrigerator until firm. Roll dough into balls and place on ungreased cookie sheets. Bake at 375 degrees for 9 to 10 minutes, or until lightly browned. Store cooled cookies, loosely covered, at room temperature. Makes 3 dozen. (from Home Cooking Magazine)

Spinach Pinwheel Canapes

  • 2 (10 oz) pkgs. frozen chopped spinach, thawed and well-drained
  • 1 C. mayo
  • 1 C. sour cream
  • 1 (1 oz.) envelope ranch dip mix
  • 3 green onions, chopped
  • 1 (8 oz) can water chestnuts, chopped
  • 8 oz. bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • 10 large flour tortillas

Combine spinach, mayo, sour cream, ranch dip mix, green onions, water chestnuts and bacon. Spread over tortillas. Roll up. Cover with plastic wrap. Chill overnight. To serve, cut each roll crosswise into 3/4 inch slices. Makes 10 dozen. (from Home Cooking Magazine)